Why Marvel’s weakened heroes are DC’s box office crisis

Hilariously so. DC’s overpowered heroes don’t give a good run for Marvel’s money ( or anyone’s) at the box office. And they have only themselves to blame.

It’s fun reading a comic for 5 minutes with somebody with immense power. Nothing boring at all.

Wanna know boring? Watching a 2+hour film about a guy who is literally invincible.

Comics are more colourful and light headed for the reader. Any amount of absurd power is pretty digestible. Comic books recur for a longer duration establishing the various feats of the characters. They lend light to the characters strength after developing a strong character arc. This gives enough time and allows the reader susceptible to suggestion that the character has developed powers and also has a few new tricks up his sleeve.

Movies are a two hour long journey/sojourn where there is not often enough time to develop the character, establish his powers, put out the situations and internal conflicts that have led to super powering or establish any of their existential ones. At the least you would require more than one movie to do so.

From a writer’s perspective, overpowering a character makes it arduous to create a Machiavelli equivalent to oppose. The hero is only as good as the villain. Powering up a villain does create an engaging screenplay and does indeed not let the mind waver.

Remember the Joker. Remember how he was just an idea more than a threatening physical force. Batman had to deal and not let the Joker’s idea win than the massacre or murder or the madness he caused. Such character arcs were developed in a short period of time thanks to some excellent script writing and dialogues that accentuated the Joker’s ideology.

MCU has powered down Thor and Hulk to their puny version when a fight between the two has resulted in tearing down the planet in their comic alter egos. With that kind of power the ship in which they fought in the first Avengers movie wouldn’t have lasted long. In simpler terms, Thor is as powerful as Superman, adjudicating based on the feats he has performed, and Hulk matches Superman in mere strength. Such a version would have resulted in a dull movie where there would be no villain and New York to fight.

Compare MCU Tony Stark, a man with faults from surface to core, with relatively high power to comics Stark, a man who certainly has faults, however except in a few story lines never present themselves. Oh, plus a LOT of power, so much he can take on super powered individuals and laugh in their face. Watching 2 hours of the latter? That would be painful. Even Iron Man 2 is better than that.

Then look at a DC hero – Superman. Almost equally as powerful in comics as he is in the DCEU. Man of Steel was pretty boring. Watching a long film surrounding an immortal character is just cringeworthy. BvS? That was a bit better as then Superman had an actual challenge, but they downplayed it so much and it was condensed to about 7 minutes. He was immortal for the rest of the film. Also JL, where it took Superman only a fraction of the entire movie to defeat the villain. Still boring.

So yeah, down-powering characters is very much the MCU way. I think it’s because of the length of films compared to the time taken to read a comic book… Who knows? But it works, it makes the films far more interesting if the character has real, genuine challenges. Otherwise it’s like watching a film about a human trying to open a pickle jar.

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